Tiles for America

Closeup photographs of some of the tiles found on the Tiles for America:

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According to the tilesofamerica.com- “The first New York memorial is located on a chain link fence at the corner of 7th Avenue and 11th Street.”

Tiles for America was started on September 12, 2001, by me-Lorrie Veasey, in response to the events of September 11th. I live in Chelsea, with a clear view down 7th Avenue to where the towers once stood. On the day of the attacks, my husband and I walked down the street to the corner of 7th Avenue and 11th Street, where St. Vincent’s Hospital is located, with the intention of donating blood. We owned a store located across the street-a paint your own pottery shop called OUR NAME IS MUD.

One of the many reasons I started Tiles For America is that I am not capable of describing in words how effected I was by the events of September 11th. Eight years later, I can still only say that I shared the desire of millions that day: to be able to dig. Because I was not able to dig, I used my hands for what they do best, and I fashioned close to 500 ceramic angels and American flags–all inscribed with messages of hope and inspiration. I attached these to the fence of the MTA parking lot across from the hospital, with hopes that these would be missives of good will–tiny clay “Get Well” messages for the victims we hoped would be found and brought to St. Vincents.

Read more at: http://tilesforamerica.blogspot.com/2009/05/story-of-tiles-for-america.html

Links:
http://tilesforamerica.blogspot.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulry_Square
http://www.tilesforamerica.com/

Edward Hopper- ‘Nighhawks’ Painting
The spot most usually associated with the former location is a now-vacant lot known as Mulry Square, at the intersection of Seventh Avenue South, Greenwich Avenue, and West 11th Street, about seven blocks west of Hopper’s studio on Washington Square. However, according to a New York Times article by blogger Jeremiah Moss, this cannot be the location of the diner that inspired the painting, as a gas station occupied that lot from the 1930s to the 1970s.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nighthawks

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